BASIC compiler for ARM

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RChadwick
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BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by RChadwick » Fri Dec 02, 2016 10:02 pm

I'm looking for a BASIC compiler for ARM microcontrollers. After googling around, I found a link to this website. However, it seems to only sell $10 chips that can be programmed in BASIC. Is there a compiler available? If so, how much is it? What chips will it work with?
Thanks.



basicchip
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by basicchip » Sat Dec 03, 2016 1:49 pm

We have ported the compiler to a number of platforms, check the Web site compilers for the current list. It is $5 for download unlimited non-commercial use.

RChadwick
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by RChadwick » Mon Dec 12, 2016 12:23 am

Thank you for your response.
Do you have a link to the compilers? I cannot find anything on your website about compilers, which is why I posted the message.
Thanks.

basicchip
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by basicchip » Mon Dec 12, 2016 4:39 pm

It is on a pulldown on the products tab. I guess I will have to figure out how to do mouse-over better for phones and tablets.

http://coridium.us/comp-directory.html

We support established products, otherwise we could not do support. Though I have been toying with the idea of putting a generic version out there, as open source.

RChadwick
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by RChadwick » Mon Dec 12, 2016 4:55 pm

Ahh, I figured it out. I'm not using a tablet. The link you provided had no mention of a compiler. I thought it was just selling chips. When I clicked on one of the chips, then I saw more details about a compiler. While I appreciate your help, I'm going to look elsewhere. As your compiler is well hidden, I'm guessing it's not very popular. Also, as it isn't mentioned on your website in an obvious manner, it looks like it might be an afterthought. I'm hoping to find a well-supported BASIC compiler in active development, with a strong community, for ARM.
Thanks anyway!

basicchip
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by basicchip » Mon Dec 12, 2016 10:13 pm

Well the title of that page is COMPILER DIRECTORY. And on that page are boards that we support the compiler on, as well as all the boards we produce. You have to run the compiler on something, and those are boards that are readily available in the market.

We have been selling the compiler for more than 10 years now, and have ported it to a number of CPUs not in that list for various OEMs.

RChadwick
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by RChadwick » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:48 pm

Thank you for your response.

My observation is that your compiler (Does it have a name?) would be MUCH more popular if it wasn't purposefully hidden. I have to admit I actively had to look, before I found where it said 'Compiler Directory'. That in itself is hardly helpful. If I didn't already suspect from somewhere else there was a compiler hiding on your website somewhere, I would think these are random links to someone else's compiler, or some kind of compiler documentation, or perhaps cracked compilers put in a directory, or a directory of compilers from other manufacturers, or perhaps C++ compilers. I would think that IF I noticed where it said 'Compiler Directory'. As an example, one compiler I use frequently, is called BASCOM. It has a name, and when you go to their website, there is no confusion they sell BASIC compilers, what their capabilities are, how much they are, how proud they are of BASCOM, and what you can do with them. There is a very active forum where there is a lot of help for programmers. Do you understand? I had exactly THREE clues that you even have a BASIC compiler here.

1) From a causal mention on another website. Ironically, I got the most information there.
2) From you, after an unnecessarily long exchange to find exactly where the compiler is.
3) From the 'Compiler Directory' page, which still told me VERY LITTLE.

It seems the only way to find out about it is to download a random EXE and run it. That sounds like a great way to get Malware.

I don't mean to beat you up. I truly hope your compiler succeeds. For that to happen, someone needs to know about it.

1) It needs a name. Maybe it has one. I don't know.
2) It needs it's own page, with it's name prominently displayed.
3) There needs to be a description of the language. Is it like VB? Old DOS BASIC? Line Numbers? What features? Work with USB? Graphics? Libraries?
4) You need example code for people to compile, try, and learn from.
5) If there are prices, you need to state them clearly. CLEARLY.
6) You need to make the compiler page VERY clear what it's purpose is (To promote usage of your compiler).
7) You need to mention the compiler prominently on your main page.

After this, it is likely you'll need to be ready to expand your forum.

I don't know if your compiler is any good. It could be the best compiler on the face of the earth, but nobody will know, until you do at LEAST these seven steps. Otherwise, it appears you are embarrassed by your compiler, and don't think it worthy of anyone using. I'll take your word on that.

I understand that sometimes technical people are not good communicators. Some, myself included, even resent and dislike the salespeople, and their need. If these are not things you can do however, you should partner with, or hire someone who can do this. Otherwise, in 20 years you'll at best be a small blurb in an article about the most obscure compilers of the early 21st century.

Sincerely, all the best of luck.

RChadwick
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by RChadwick » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:53 pm

Also, just a quick note. Not everyone is interested in pre-made development boards. Certainly there is a market, but it would be nice, and I would expect, a compiler to be able to adapt to any board. It's the microcontroller that's unique. Why make a compiler that instead only works with one development board? Then, if a designer wants to make their own board, they are tied unnecessarily to the development board. Personally, if I make a product, I make the hardware as soon as I'm certain of the requirements, then develop the software on that. Your pushing of hardware just seems unnatural and foreign to me.

olzeke51
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by olzeke51 » Tue Dec 13, 2016 8:39 pm

@RChadwick - maybe you need a new browser - the home page says "BASIC compilers for $5" -BIG letters - across the top!!
If a person is looking for a product - a rollover the product tab shows "compilers" AND a list of 5 devices that are not produced by Coridium!!!
ONE rollover!!!
Man....

basicchip
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Re: BASIC compiler for ARM

Post by basicchip » Wed Dec 14, 2016 12:24 am

Well there are some 4000 or more ARM CPUs available at Digikey. Now each one has a different memory map, UART, Flash programming, oscillator programming, and other setup features. It takes us a day to 2 to bring up a new version of an ARM, and we are well acquainted with the steps. Those steps are far beyond the capability of most hobbyists, and probably a few software engineers.

So there is no generic ARM BASIC compiler out there, by the way we call ours ARMbasic. And we have published versions for about a dozen different ARM PCBs, and have done a dozen or more that are either for OEMs or have not been released. While we tend to do a lot of NXP versions, we have also done versions for Freescale, TI, STmicro and EMW. The bulk of our business is consulting, which usually starts with an off the shelf board to do a proof of concept, that then evolves into a semi or full custom design.

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